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Destinations, Dreams and Dogs - International adventure with a fast-track family (& dogs) of Old World values, adopting the Russian-Italian-American good life on the go…!

2012 International Adoption News

Just an update for those wonder what’s happening on the international adoption scene with some of the major players….

Kazakhstan is reopening to adoptive parents from the United States with two agencies approved to work there, Little Miracles and Across the World Adoptions.

Guatemalan officials are wading through the known list of pending cases.  The president there reports that he hopes they will be resolved within the next 12 months.  An American delegation was led by two female members of Congress, urging forward motion.

Ethiopia announces the abiilty for adoptive parents to use an escort to bring their child home to America after court, as long as at least one of the parents met the child prior to court.

Laos and Bhutan suspended international adoptions earlier this year until further notice.  Cambodia is not receiving dossiers until 2013.  India instituted new intercountry adoption guidelines in 2012 and will accept new adoption applications that comply.

China continues to chug along despite rumors last year of child-kidnapping by the One-Child police.

The Russian Family Code was amended in January, causing after-court waiting periods to expand from 10 days to currently 30 days.  Prior to the waiting period, court decisions are issued in writing 5 days after the hearing.  After the waiting period, application may be made for the child’s passport, which again adds more time.  Families are often making four separate trips to Russia to complete an adoption.

Meanwhile, since March, regional suspensions of adoptions have been rife in Russia.  Some regions are not issuing referrals, some judges are not granting court dates, and some are refusing all forward progress on adoptions involving Americans.  There are Russian regions that continue to move forward with the processing of adoptions to the U.S., so make sure that your adoption agency assigns you to one of these still-active regions.

Good news comes from the U.S. State Department. The non-immigrant and immigrant visa application fees have changed as of mid-April.  The fee for Immediate Relative and family preference applications (processed on the basis of an approved I-130, I-600 or I-800 petition) decreased from $404 to $230.

Does any of it make you want to adopt again?

 

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9 Comments : Leave a Reply

  1. avatar Linda says:

    Does this make me want to adopt again?
    We’d actually love to. But, and it’s a BIG but.
    As adoptions from Russia are getting harder and harder from Finland (there’s talk about new rules arriving from Russia, once again) and the cost is so much (even if it’s not as much as it’s over there), we made the decision not to adopt again.
    We are thinking about maybe doing some long term fostering, but we’ll see at least until our boy’s started pre-school (not day-care) in August, and see how he’ll adjust to the fact that he’s going to be there everyday 4h…
    Then again, we’re also talking about moving to Ireland… So I don’t know…
    Have to decide something fairly soon…

    • avatar admin says:

      You’re smart, Linda, to consider all of the variables. I think with school coming up, any possible moves, etc., the possibilities will sort themselves out as you just continue to move forward and live life. It will be exciting to see how it all develops!

  2. avatar Sybil says:

    It makes me think that there are so many children that won’t get families and the families that won’t get children, mostly because of bureaucracy. More than sad.

    • avatar admin says:

      There are a lot of artificial barriers to pairing children with families, aren’t there, Sybil? When we worked through the red tape for four years to bring home our second son, I told Russian officials that there was a side to adoption that they never saw. It was when the kids would arrive home and ask, “Why did it take you so long to come and get me?”

      • avatar Linda says:

        That’s so true. Our boy keeps on telling us he waited and waited, he was so sad that every night he cried cause he missed his mama and papa so much. And asking what we did when we waited (cried every night cause we missed him so much, that’s what he told us that we did).

  3. avatar Greg says:

    Ukrainian adoptions are alive and well. And you can do it without the aid of an agency if you desire. I’d be happy to recommend a facilitator if you need one. The writer can put us in contact with one another.

    • avatar admin says:

      Absolutely, thanks for mentioning that, Greg. The only reason they were not included is that it’s not really “news”. But I believe it’s very important to state. There are other more obscure countries, too, but everyone I know who’s adopted from Ukraine has said that it’s gone well. And I know a number of Russian “converts” who have headed over to Ukraine, too, in light of all of the procedural nonsense there…. Today was our last post placement (3 years) for our final two (the girls)… hmm… maybe it’s time….

  4. avatar JPInformation says:

    Thanks for these updates. I tried to adopt from Laos in January, only to find out exactly what you’ve mentioned here. It was absolutely disheartening. I recently went to Thailand and met a baby girl who my husband and I fell in love with. We are working with a Thailand family lawyer at the moment and hope to continue moving forward. I think the biggest thing to remind couples who consider international adoption is to not get discouraged by all of obstacles. One thing to remember is that a lot of the strict restrictions are in place for the children’s safety and to keep them out of the homes of abusers. I have fondness for Southeast Asia from my years of traveling there, and I am determined to adopt a child from the region. Each roadblock is devastating, but it’s important to continuously seek support and advice, and keep trying.

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